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This site is devoted to sharing pictures, letters  and poems of Sean Blake. He was a young man who loved kindness.  He enjoyed giving and receiving love. A gifted poet and writer. He was an amazing chess and card player.  Sean showed his love by cooking for family, friends and strangers alike.  You may have seen him reading palms on Church St. in Burlington, VT.  He touched many lives with his wit, charisma and love of life.

The site is maintained by Sean’ s family. We hope to show that Sean was more than his disease. We share our stories and many stories of families affected by substance use disorder. We hope there will be less stigma and shame with mental illness and substance use disorder. We hope to raise awareness of the dangers of opiates and risk of death from their use. We advocate for compassionate treatment and harm reduction.

As anyone reading this can understand, Sean wanted to live, he wanted sobriety. It takes only one moment of  weakness with an opiate to cause serious consequences. The message is don’t start. No one intends to grow up to be a slave to a substance.

Sean initially began with high dose THC products, this caused mania, psychosis and even a suicide attempt. It ended his career in the Navy.  Unfortunately, he developed polysubstance use disorder. He began use of opiates in addition to cocaine and marijuana. Sean used Oxycontin and eventually heroin.  Sadly, he transitioned from opiates to marijuana. He attempted to treat his OUD with marijuana and alcohol. While he survived five years after his OUD was “in remission”, he eventually, used something that turned out to be fentanyl. We aren’t sure if he had any idea what he was using. He still, at times, when manic,he used cocaine. However, he did have needles in his bag and we can’t say for sure what was in his mind.  He was impaired with marijuana and alcohol in addition to the small amount of fentanyl.  I wish he had been on some type of MAT, instead of trying to self-medicate.

The poems and letters were written, mostly during periods of good health.  The writings and posts chronicle his struggles with love, bipolar disorder, substance use and life.  Hopefully,  what he has left behind will help another to choose life over addiction or at least show more kindness to those struggling with this disease.

SB died at age 27 from an overdose of alcohol and fentanyl, combined with marijuana.

We will miss him forever.

Surreal

Life often takes some very sudden turns. When Sean died, I was in shock. It didn’t seem real. He was on life support, no sign of life, at least in his brain. However, his body seemed in such good shape. He was fit, not underweight. He looked nothing like what I thought when I thought of substance use. Sure many times he had looked thin, gaunt, a hollowed out form of a human. This wasn’t one of those times. The image didn’t fit with the reality.

So, with this pandemic.. I should have been more expecting, more prepared. Sure, I ordered a few masks for my medical office. I even bought some face shields. I just never thought it would come to the dangerous fight that is happening across the country.

Life is like that often not what your expecting.

I have had so many patients fear ovarian cancer, only to neglect their diabetes and hypertension. I have had so many anxious Mom’s fear losing their children to stillbirth, or childhood cancer. Yet, when my son was dealing with life threatening illness, I couldn’t see it. Those episodes were behind him (us). He had survived the worst and was fine now. Well, maybe not fine but, at least in the improving category.

When it did happen, when Sean overdosed, I wasn’t on a trip, or at work. I was at a program meeting. Surrounded by friends. I was scheduled for vacation in 2 days. I hardly needed to take time off work.

Life is fragile and we often are the worst at seeing our own reality. Thank goodness for all those therapists and good friends out there. They can clue you in. Take your own inventory as they say.

In the mean time, stay aware, flexible and kind…you never know when you’ll need that kindness coming back to you.

Vulnerability

A few weeks ago, my dog, Yves, was attacked in the woods by another dog. Yves is a grey standard poodle; he is thirteen years old and not in the best of health. We were just finishing our walk. I felt very calm and peaceful, typical after a nice walk in the woods. It was snowing lightly; the woods were beautiful.  I felt refreshed, ready to start my workday. Suddenly, out of nowhere a neighborhood dog came down the path and brutally attacked Yves. Going for his neck in a vicious way. I struggled to kick the dog off Yves. The owners walked by me and lended no aid or even attempted to get their dog. After several screams and kicks, I fell down in the snow. I looked up at the dog and rolled over, ready for it to attack me. Luckily, the dog left and rejoined his owners. I don’t know why it stopped; I was just very grateful that it did.

Yves was bitten in several areas, not enough to need stiches. The owners eventually came to our home to apologize, I had already had to go into work, my jeans still damp, so I never got to hear them out. It’s ok, I wouldn’t have believed anything they had to say. Actions speak louder than words.

I was terrified. It brought back all the distress of helplessness that I encountered with Sean. Trying to fend off something evil and vicious with no assistance at all. Trying to argue with an insurance company, trying to get him off the streets and into treatment. Trying to cope with the sleepless nights when he was missing yet again. Convincing colleagues, that people with substance use disorders and mental health conditions deserve respect and care.

I’ve become less forgiving. I used to give everyone the benefit of the doubt, always willing to believe in the good of our community. No, not so much anymore. I have seen the injustice of the world, even in Vermont, and I won’t back down. It’s a good thing, I was way too nice.

The injustice of our criminal justice system. The all-out greed of the Purdue Pharma.

Don’t get me wrong, there are many people who are good out there. Lawyers, doctors, pharmacists, police officers, writers, treatment providers all doing their best.  At least knowing you’re not alone helps the vulnerability.

No the PTSD won’t get erased, and Sean won’t come back to life. However, his life won’t be in vain, that I am very sure of.

So the website is for-kindness, which is meant for the world to have more kindness.  I choose the name because Sean was “for kindness”

Post bail November, 2015

Dear Mom.

I love you. You brought me into this world, gave me everything I ever needed and most of what I wanted for years. I’ve abused and manipulated your kindness and love. I never did treatment, I wasted your money. I tried to steal from you. I’m just a lech on everyone. I have been nice and kind and loving like you but, it was an act to get what I want.I am right where I need to be and will be for years.I don’t want to fight anymore….I’m not going to get what I want and that is a lesson I need to learn, you don’t always get what you want.I wanted you to post bail, I was really ready for change..I will not fight anymore, I will sit in prison and do nothing.I want to blame the police, the bullying and PTSD but, they only play a small role. At the end of the day we make our own beds, our own luck, and I will try and be the best man I can be.I want to be like you, successive (sic), loving, hardworking and have a true purpose.

THANK YOU for being my role model and my friend.

Your son, Sean

(Excerpts from a letter from Sean, I edited out some more personal pieces from the letter, I don’t think he would want them published. I am very sad reading this, how down on himself he was. He was worn out and tired, angry at himself. He had recently broken into our home and threatened his brother and myself. I doubt he would have really hurt us. He picked up his belongs and moved into a friends. Unfortunately, the friend was admitted to the hospital for psychiatric reasons and the young man’s family not knowing Sean had permission to stay at his place, called the police for trespassing. We didn’t post bail and Sean stayed in jail until he could get to treatment a month or so later. My most significant regrets involve not working harder to get better psychiatric treatment and less jail time. Our family was just completely worn out)

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Vagabond

I recently returned from Vieques, Puerto Rico. I have had the blessing of being able to travel there for a week every year, a vacation with my sister, Dawn, sometimes with my niece and/or Mom. We have been heading there for the last 10 years. A treasure, as travel had been a challenge with Sean’s illness, my husband staying home so I could get away for a short time.

It is a beautiful place, lovely beaches, horses roaming free, it is as if time stood still for a few years or decades.

I thought Sean would love it here. Relaxed and carefree, I suspect he could have gotten along pretty well, at least for a while. The geographic cure can work, sometimes for a week, sometimes for years. Usually, though life and it’s complications catch up.

I once worked with a physician in New York, who after struggling with personal issues, made it to Vieques. He tended bar and made a new beginning. Life caught up with him there as well, his adventures now the subject of a book (autobiography)

One morning, our little gang (Mom, Dawn, niece and I) arrived at a remote beach. You have to travel a pretty challenging road, with a four- wheel drive to get to Navio beach. It is one of our favorites. An exposed beach, plenty of surf and caves to explore. One time, we met a young man, doing yoga on the beach. His beat- up van was nearby, likely his camp for the night. He was getting ready for the day, yoga and a swim. He had long hair, no clothing on, and seemed very relaxed and happy. My Mom said, “Wow, he is a great swimmer”.  My sister and I looked at each other, smiled and thought “Sean”.

I didn’t want to bring Sean to Vieques, I thought he would be lost forever. A vagabond for good. I knew the medical facilities weren’t great, especially the mental health care. Sean spoke some Spanish, maybe enough to get around, I don’t know.

The idea of him being lost was terrifying. It was something I worked through in therapy, I could cope with him being out of contact with our family, if I knew he was well. I knew some people with substance use and mental health struggles needed to be away from their family of origin to become well.  A chance to find a chosen family.  It certainly was preferable to an overdose death.

So Sean lives on, in our hearts and minds, and in some, their real-life organs (his heart, liver and kidneys). A vagabond forever.

Univision

Rehab story now in Spanish, click the link below.

Vox story

Appreciate the translation of the Vox story into Spanish. Sean was close to many whose first language is Spanish. Friends from high school, friends in the Bronx..

Sean’s trip to Chile, after high school graduation. Sean befriended Victor and Christian when they were working here in Vermont as students. Sean saved for and paid for the trip on his own. He was graciously hosted by his friend’s families. Here are a few photos from the trip.

Criminal Justice or is it?

So often, the frustration of dealing with the courts remains my biggest regret.

We tried to get charges we had filed (mistaking the charge we thought we weren’t filing for a more serious one actually ..)

I wrote, with no success to explain the situation. My pleas fell on deaf ears.

In the end, as one of Sean’s friends said ” I could never understand what that kid was in jail for..”

State’s Attorney Office

32 Cherry St.

Burlington, VT 05401

October 18, 2015

Justin Jiron, Esq.:

In November of 2014 I made a request to Edward Sutton Esq, stating that I would like to drop charges in the two alleged burglary incidents at my home on August 17th and 18th. These charges are against my son Sean Blake. I would like to reiterate that is still my opinion nearly one year later.

As I mentioned in my previous letter, I was frustrated with Sean’s coming into our home. He didn’t think I was home and intended to retrieve some personal items. I was home with my younger son, my husband was teaching away for the semester. I was worried he was going to steal from us. I asked the police to press charges, as I thought I was enforcing a no-trespass order. Unfortunately, that order had not yet been served. I did not intend to press charges for burglary. I thought he might get a warning or minor offense ticket.

After reviewing all of Sean’s charges, I would like to reiterate my request to drop all charges related to those incidents on August 17 and 18.

I feel strongly that Sean needs more treatment and less incarceration. In jail he has not received the treatment he needs to recover fully.

I have confidence in Sean’s ability to improve and become a productive member of society. I think this is more likely to occur if he receives treatment.

I hope Sean can continue treatment as part of sentencing for his offenses.

Sincerely,

Kimberly D. Blake